Galvanize

Enter.
Enter.

I’m fascinated by how spaces and places become innovation hubs.  Collaborations can unite networks for creatives and the tech industry.  As an artist, I visualize the movement of this energy.  When offered the opportunity to observe, listen, research, and create at a San Francisco incubator, the answer was yes!

Light.
Light.

Nestled in an alley between new construction and history, Galvanize houses diverse startups, collaborations, and educational opportunities.  Sitting on the 5th floor of the building, a geometric skylight opens itself to possibilities.  Discussions of business deals, formulas, and marketing strategies float in the air.  This isn’t your old school office of cubicles and white walls.

Line.
Line.

Umaimah Mendhro, VIDA Founder and CEO, provided a tour sharing her remarkable history amongst various floors of robust brain activity.  Starting from a home office, her growth over the last year has been remarkable.  Sitting on the fifth floor, I decided to investigate from top t0 bottom.  Tables and chairs are moved to fit the day’s use.  Configurations change with need and become routine.

Surface.
Surface.

 

Texture.
Texture.

 

Pattern.
Pattern.

It was remarkable from my observation how an open innovation community can be so fresh and civil.  Galvanize refers to an action where people become concerned about an issue by becoming a catalyst for change.  This is the face of what change looks like.  It adapts, contorts, and infiltrates spaces and ideas.

Pipe.
Movement.

Late and great art critic Robert Hughes once said: “If art can’t tell us about the world we live in…I don’t believe there’s much point in having it.”  Galvanize is a territory that houses cross-pollinations of ideas mixed with infectious energy.  It feels familiar yet new.  My experience provided a perspective that was foreign but now additive.

Today on my 42nd Birthday and onwards, Hughes guided and I accepted.

The links:

http://www.galvanize.com

http://shopvida.com/collections/voices/jenny-e-balisle

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/07/arts/robert-hughes-art-critic-whose-writing-was-elegant-and-contentious-dies-at-74.html?_r=0

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