The Founding Mothers

7/3/11 Richmond, CA fireworks

Independence is the quality or state of being independent, not subject to control by others, and not requiring or relying on something else.  On this Independence Day, I reflect on the Founding Fathers’ influence and motivation as America celebrates with fireworks, BBQs, parades, and fairs.  Today I also thank the deserving women behind the revolution that fought for freedom.

Two women that had great influence during the American Revolution were Abigail Adams and Mercy Otis Warren.  Abigail Adams married founding father John Adams in 1764 and had five children.  Her husband John Adams looked to Abigail for advice during the American Revolution.   According to the National First Ladies’ Library: “As the Second Continental Congress drew up and debated the Declaration of Independence through 1776, Abigail Adams began to press the argument in letters to her husband that the creation of a new form of government was an opportunity to make equitable the legal status of women to that of men.  Despite her inability to convince him of this, the text of those letters became some of the earliest known writings calling for women’s equal rights.”

Mercy Otis Warren was a political author during the American Revolution, which for a woman was rare and unheard of.  Her writings, satire, and political propaganda helped influence and motivate the populace against the royal authority.  According to the Massachusetts Historical Society: “… the Warren home became a common meeting place for revolutionaries.  She also participated in the Patriot cause, beginning with the 1772 publication of her play The Adulateur, the first in a long line of similar propagandistic pieces published anonymously.”

Abigail Adams and Mercy Otis Warren both supported equal rights, public education, and independence.  They planted and supported the ideas behind the American Revolution.  A tradition born in America, that I don’t take for granted and celebrate everyday.

The Links:

http://www.wic.org/misc/history.htm

http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=2

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